Tag Archives: Chicken

Prairie Dust Chicken Bites

Recipe:

Meatballs –
20 oz (1 1/2 lb) ground chicken thigh and/or leg meat
1/2 cup chopped fresh spinach
2 tbsp. chopped flat leaf parsley
1 tbsp. chopped fresh basil
1 tsp. chopped fresh oregano
1/4 cup feta cheese (or similar brined white cheese)
1 1/2 tbsp. Prairie Dust

Combine all ingredients together in a large bowl. The mixture will be very moist. Refrigerate a minimum of 2 hours before attempting to portion.

Cover a cookie sheet or baking pan with aluminum foil. Select a sheet sufficiently large enough to fit 3 dozen meatballs (1 – 1/2 inch). Forming meatballs is best done by hand, as the mixture is too sticky for most scoops/dishers.

Once the meatballs have been hand formed and placed on the cookie sheet, put in freezer a minimum of 4 hours (or until thoroughly frozen). If making meatballs in advance, once frozen, they can be transferred to a freezer bag or similar container for extended storage.

If cooking the meatballs in the oven, freezing is not necessary. However, for grilling, it is essential that they are frozen before cooking.

Set smoker to medium heat (275° – 300°).

Generously coat a pizza screen (18″ is perfect for a Large Big Green Egg) with nonstick spray. Evenly spread the meatballs on the screen, and put the screen on the smoker.

Once the bottom of the meatballs has browned and a crust is formed, flip the meatballs over. Depending on the temperature, each side will take 5 – 7 minutes.

Remove from heat, and serve with yogurt sauce.

– Yogurt sauce
1/2 cup Greek yogurt (Greek Gods plain is recommended as it is quite thick)
1/4 cup sour cream
1/4 cup feta cheese
1 small lemon (juice and zest)
1 tsp. chopped garlic
6-8 whole fresh basil leaves
1/8 tsp. fresh oregano
1 tsp. Prairie Dust

Put all ingredients for the yogurt sauce in a blender, and puree until smooth. Refrigerate until cool.

 

Thank You, Scott Shimano, Green Card Q for the recipe

Beer Can Chicken

  • 1 large whole chicken (4 to 5 pounds)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 5 tablespoons Cucamonga Cattle Co. Original Trail Boss , Prairie Dust or Double Barrel BBQ Rub
  • 1 can your favorite beer (12 ounces)

Remove and discard the fat just inside the body cavities of the chicken. Remove the neck and giblets. Rinse the chicken, inside and out, under cold running water, then drain and blot dry, inside and out, with paper towels. Sprinkle 1 tablespoon of the Cucamonga Cattle Co. rub inside the body and neck cavities, Rub chicken with oil and Sprinkle another 3 tablespoon rub all over the skin of the bird. If you wish, rub 1 tablespoon of the mixture between the flesh and the skin. Cover and refrigerate the chicken while you preheat the grill.

Set up the grill for indirect grilling placing a drip pan in the center. If using a charcoal grill, preheat it to medium.

If you want to add a smoke flavor, add 1 to 2 cups of  wood chips, or 2 to 4 chunks, to the coals just before you start to cook, and again whenever you replenish the coals. If using a gas grill, place all the wood chips in the smoker box and preheat the grill to high; then, when smoke appears, lower the heat to medium.

Pop the tab on the beer can. Pour out the top inch of beer. Holding the chicken upright, with the opening of the body cavity down, insert the beer can into the cavity.

When ready to cook, if using charcoal, toss half the wood chips on the coals. Oil the grill grate. Stand the chicken up in the center of the hot grate, over the drip pan. Spread out the legs to form a sort of tripod, to support the bird.

Cover the grill and cook the chicken until fall-off-the-bone tender, 2 hours. If using charcoal, add 10 to 12 fresh coals per side after 1 hour.

Using tongs; lift the bird to a cutting board or platter, holding the metal spatula underneath the beer can for support. Let stand for 5 minutes, remove and discard can
(Be careful not to spill hot beer on yourself.) and carve bird.

To set up you charcoal grill for indirect grilling, light the coals. When they are blazing red, use tongs to transfer them to opposite sides of the grill, arranging them in two piles. Some grills have special half-moon-shaped baskets to hold the coals at the sides; others have wire fences that hook onto the bottom gate. Let the coals burn until they are covered with a thin layer of gray ash. Set the drip pan in the center of the grill, between the mounds of coals. Place the food on the grate over the drip pan, and cover the grill. You’ll need to add about 10 to 12 briquettes to each side after an hour of cooking.